variegate:

halftheskymovement:


Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department. This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men. There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.


So inspiring!

variegate:

halftheskymovement:

Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department. This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men. 

There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.

So inspiring!

locallycrafted:

See Why This Blank Paper Is Already a Masterpiece

Meet Christopher James, owner of Porridge Papers, an independently owned, local paper mill and letterpress studio in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Christopher moved to Lincoln when he was 20 years old for school and started working at an art store.  One day, feeling spontaneous, he brought home a papermaking kit and a small blender and began what would become his life’s passion: making handmade paper.  Find out how Christopher went from blending paper in his kitchen to running one of the most unique small businesses in the Lincoln area in this installment of Locally Crafted Goods. 

(via romancingthelookyloos)

(Source: rorybbellows, via astock)

nprbooks:

Our buddies over at Code Switch are taking a look at a very exciting new development in comics — the return of the Green Turtle!

For the first time since the 1940s, the Green Turtle is returning to comic bookshelves. The long-forgotten character has been resurrected in The Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel about what many comic fans consider the first Asian-American superhero.
"He’s like a classic, American World War II hero," says cartoonist Gene Luen Yang, who collaborated with illustrator Sonny Liew on The Shadow Hero.

You remember Gene Yang from last year’s shattering Boxers & Saints. In terms of his fellow superheroes, Yang says the Green Turtle is more Bruce Wayne than Clark Kent. “He doesn’t have any explicit superpowers in the original books. But he’s very agile,” Yang explains.

Yang wrote The Shadow Hero to finally give the Green Turtle an origin story and an explanation for his — let’s be honest — not-so-heroic-sounding name.
" ‘Turtle head’ is an insult in Chinese," says Yang, who is Chinese-American and adds that his parents would always tell him to not wear green hats. "There’s a saying about wearing green hats, which means you are a cuckold."
So, instead, Yang connected the Green Turtle to the celestial tortoise, one of four guardian animal spirits of Chinese mythology.

An enduring mystery around the series is whether creator Chu Hing wanted the Green Turtle to be Chinese-American like himself. Rumor has it the publisher didn’t want an Asian superhero as World War II was raging in the pacific — so the Green Turtle always wore a mask.

Yang’s new graphic novel firmly establishes the Green Turtle as Asian-American, unmasking the superhero as a teenager named Hank Chu, the American-born son of Chinese immigrants living in the Chinatown of a fictional city on California’s coast in the 1930s.
Hank transforms from a scrawny neighborhood kid into one of his city’s top crime-fighters. But in the end, he’s still caught between Chinatown and the world outside.
"Every superhero has this superhero identity and a civilian identity," Yang explains. "A lot of their lives are about code switching. It’s about switching from one mode of expectations to another mode of expectations. And I really think that mirrors something in the immigrant’s kid’s life."

Time to pay a visit to my friendly local comic store, I think!
— Petra

nprbooks:

Our buddies over at Code Switch are taking a look at a very exciting new development in comics — the return of the Green Turtle!

For the first time since the 1940s, the Green Turtle is returning to comic bookshelves. The long-forgotten character has been resurrected in The Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel about what many comic fans consider the first Asian-American superhero.

"He’s like a classic, American World War II hero," says cartoonist Gene Luen Yang, who collaborated with illustrator Sonny Liew on The Shadow Hero.

You remember Gene Yang from last year’s shattering Boxers & Saints. In terms of his fellow superheroes, Yang says the Green Turtle is more Bruce Wayne than Clark Kent. “He doesn’t have any explicit superpowers in the original books. But he’s very agile,” Yang explains.

Yang wrote The Shadow Hero to finally give the Green Turtle an origin story and an explanation for his — let’s be honest — not-so-heroic-sounding name.

" ‘Turtle head’ is an insult in Chinese," says Yang, who is Chinese-American and adds that his parents would always tell him to not wear green hats. "There’s a saying about wearing green hats, which means you are a cuckold."

So, instead, Yang connected the Green Turtle to the celestial tortoise, one of four guardian animal spirits of Chinese mythology.

An enduring mystery around the series is whether creator Chu Hing wanted the Green Turtle to be Chinese-American like himself. Rumor has it the publisher didn’t want an Asian superhero as World War II was raging in the pacific — so the Green Turtle always wore a mask.

Yang’s new graphic novel firmly establishes the Green Turtle as Asian-American, unmasking the superhero as a teenager named Hank Chu, the American-born son of Chinese immigrants living in the Chinatown of a fictional city on California’s coast in the 1930s.

Hank transforms from a scrawny neighborhood kid into one of his city’s top crime-fighters. But in the end, he’s still caught between Chinatown and the world outside.

"Every superhero has this superhero identity and a civilian identity," Yang explains. "A lot of their lives are about code switching. It’s about switching from one mode of expectations to another mode of expectations. And I really think that mirrors something in the immigrant’s kid’s life."

Time to pay a visit to my friendly local comic store, I think!

— Petra

(via npr)

megamissingno:

  • grammar police are kind of like real police, using structures set in place by the educated majority to target mainly underprivileged groups as a means of self-elevation

(via brentammm)

bezzerrr:

This little person fills up a giant part of my heart. Can’t tell y’all how GOOD it is to have a snoring, slobbering goofball snoozin on my couch.

bezzerrr:

This little person fills up a giant part of my heart. Can’t tell y’all how GOOD it is to have a snoring, slobbering goofball snoozin on my couch.

tastefullyoffensive:

Artist Telmo Pieper Repaints His Own Childhood Drawings

Previously: Everyday Objects Turned Into Creative Illustrations

(via papipaolo)

ideabook2point0 said: You and your beau also in the market for gay friends?

Always!

escupir:

“… Y aunque no sea cierto dime que me quieres mucho y que no puedes vivir sin mi”

escupir:

… Y aunque no sea cierto dime que me quieres mucho y que no puedes vivir sin mi

(via queerfemmebabe)